"],"_oembed_time_8ed7d0b2371ff0fd3775247967c9b3f2":["1530018716"],"_oembed_0cb1c9aa104c6209918ce72fc8a754b4":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_0cb1c9aa104c6209918ce72fc8a754b4":["1530018716"],"_oembed_be676377a29207a34a945a4bdffc5338":["

She said it! Lumpenscoretariat, my favourite word from Marion Fourcade ❤ @hiig_berlin @bpb_de lecture series pic.twitter.com/5O1RFVTttF

— Lena Ulbricht (@lena_ulbricht) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_be676377a29207a34a945a4bdffc5338":["1530018716"],"_oembed_8eafdbae1dc59b6c911c402cd5e8be3b":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_8eafdbae1dc59b6c911c402cd5e8be3b":["1530018716"],"_oembed_f4ae0214e41f1a211cec9e77fb593b30":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_f4ae0214e41f1a211cec9e77fb593b30":["1530018716"],"_wp_page_template":["default"],"page_contacts":["a:2:{s:5:\"title\";s:0:\"\";s:4:\"text\";s:0:\"\";}"],"_yoast_wpseo_content_score":["30"],"post_doi":["10.5281/zenodo.1303313"],"_post_doi":["post_doi"],"_oembed_0bb1be6aa2f71136578b079ef5cc7018":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_0bb1be6aa2f71136578b079ef5cc7018":["1531391077"],"_oembed_6d280ece8ad9316d2157330e4f4a987e":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_6d280ece8ad9316d2157330e4f4a987e":["1531391077"],"_oembed_57b4ff5bfeadc1f813fe66c950c6cb1c":["

She said it! Lumpenscoretariat, my favourite word from Marion Fourcade ❤ @hiig_berlin @bpb_de lecture series pic.twitter.com/5O1RFVTttF

— Lena Ulbricht (@lena_ulbricht) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_57b4ff5bfeadc1f813fe66c950c6cb1c":["1530018838"],"_oembed_da667d9607186a00cfac7cb6bc2f8c44":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_da667d9607186a00cfac7cb6bc2f8c44":["1531391077"],"_oembed_3b18bd3d577947df0415c7cab7c997ae":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_3b18bd3d577947df0415c7cab7c997ae":["1531391077"],"_yoast_wpseo_primary_category":["52"],"ampforwp_custom_content_editor":[""],"ampforwp_custom_content_editor_checkbox":[null],"ampforwp-amp-on-off":["default"],"ampforwp-redirection-on-off":["enable"],"_oembed_257eebea6c31d11dd16c2a10d2a7c799":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_257eebea6c31d11dd16c2a10d2a7c799":["1530018848"],"_oembed_c63d853e34ec8a3b0cbe133e8364cb13":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_c63d853e34ec8a3b0cbe133e8364cb13":["1530018848"],"_oembed_3082bdee7a4e9feef7b5965313e6eb7b":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_3082bdee7a4e9feef7b5965313e6eb7b":["1530018848"],"_oembed_7e3a4a2fc56c25b0b0ca8767f42786a4":["

She said it! Lumpenscoretariat, my favourite word from Marion Fourcade ❤ @hiig_berlin @bpb_de lecture series pic.twitter.com/5O1RFVTttF

— Lena Ulbricht (@lena_ulbricht) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_7e3a4a2fc56c25b0b0ca8767f42786a4":["1530018849"],"_oembed_bdefc4ec6f338cc743590b8f552aa3a6":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_bdefc4ec6f338cc743590b8f552aa3a6":["1530018849"],"_oembed_c5c835e55b6ec27304a09b2c8514ad77":["
Newsletter Anmeldung
"],"_oembed_time_c5c835e55b6ec27304a09b2c8514ad77":["1530021381"],"_thumbnail_id":["49223"],"_oembed_0c0a40e93ba747ad6c419564f57295ce":["

She said it! Lumpenscoretariat, my favourite word from Marion Fourcade ❤ @hiig_berlin @bpb_de lecture series pic.twitter.com/5O1RFVTttF

— Lena Ulbricht (@lena_ulbricht) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_0c0a40e93ba747ad6c419564f57295ce":["1530030163"],"_oembed_dfc2c8255096359c59ab60745da60711":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_dfc2c8255096359c59ab60745da60711":["1530187813"],"_oembed_890fdec77ff0c14bad46b56962c591cc":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_890fdec77ff0c14bad46b56962c591cc":["1530187813"],"_oembed_cf40150bd571a281c3a2b3e26a043a21":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_cf40150bd571a281c3a2b3e26a043a21":["1530187813"],"_oembed_8825224377a6f306f55d5ad09663fdea":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_8825224377a6f306f55d5ad09663fdea":["1530187813"],"_oembed_c0e1fd068fb864858570a0a76e132434":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_c0e1fd068fb864858570a0a76e132434":["1530621009"],"_oembed_65e24a2772e55215c71a07d8b5fffda5":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_65e24a2772e55215c71a07d8b5fffda5":["1530621009"],"_oembed_bbb5db6a03e5e4b6e873b8bf1268b6c8":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_bbb5db6a03e5e4b6e873b8bf1268b6c8":["1530621009"],"_oembed_71a52e268c91b631fc40a8f018dc1c81":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_71a52e268c91b631fc40a8f018dc1c81":["1530621009"],"_fl_builder_draft":["a:4:{s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c24c0\";O:8:\"stdClass\":5:{s:4:\"node\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c24c0\";s:4:\"type\";s:3:\"row\";s:6:\"parent\";N;s:8:\"position\";i:0;s:8:\"settings\";O:8:\"stdClass\":139:{s:5:\"width\";s:5:\"fixed\";s:13:\"content_width\";s:5:\"fixed\";s:17:\"max_content_width\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"full_height\";s:7:\"default\";s:17:\"content_alignment\";s:6:\"center\";s:10:\"text_color\";s:0:\"\";s:10:\"link_color\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"hover_color\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"heading_color\";s:0:\"\";s:7:\"bg_type\";s:4:\"none\";s:8:\"bg_image\";s:0:\"\";s:9:\"bg_repeat\";s:4:\"none\";s:11:\"bg_position\";s:13:\"center center\";s:13:\"bg_attachment\";s:6:\"scroll\";s:7:\"bg_size\";s:5:\"cover\";s:15:\"bg_video_source\";s:9:\"wordpress\";s:8:\"bg_video\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"bg_video_webm\";s:0:\"\";s:16:\"bg_video_url_mp4\";s:0:\"\";s:17:\"bg_video_url_webm\";s:0:\"\";s:20:\"bg_video_service_url\";s:0:\"\";s:14:\"bg_video_audio\";s:2:\"no\";s:17:\"bg_video_fallback\";s:0:\"\";s:9:\"ss_source\";s:9:\"wordpress\";s:9:\"ss_photos\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"ss_feed_url\";s:0:\"\";s:8:\"ss_speed\";s:1:\"3\";s:13:\"ss_transition\";s:4:\"fade\";s:21:\"ss_transitionDuration\";s:1:\"1\";s:12:\"ss_randomize\";s:5:\"false\";s:17:\"bg_parallax_image\";s:0:\"\";s:17:\"bg_parallax_speed\";s:4:\"fast\";s:8:\"bg_color\";s:0:\"\";s:10:\"bg_opacity\";s:3:\"100\";s:18:\"pp_bg_overlay_type\";s:10:\"full_width\";s:16:\"bg_overlay_color\";s:0:\"\";s:21:\"pp_bg_overlay_color_2\";s:0:\"\";s:23:\"pp_bg_overlay_direction\";s:6:\"bottom\";s:18:\"bg_overlay_opacity\";s:2:\"50\";s:13:\"gradient_type\";s:6:\"linear\";s:14:\"gradient_color\";a:2:{s:7:\"primary\";s:6:\"d81660\";s:9:\"secondary\";s:6:\"7d22bd\";}s:16:\"linear_direction\";s:6:\"bottom\";s:11:\"border_type\";s:0:\"\";s:12:\"border_color\";s:0:\"\";s:14:\"border_opacity\";s:3:\"100\";s:16:\"enable_separator\";s:2:\"no\";s:14:\"separator_type\";s:4:\"none\";s:15:\"separator_color\";s:6:\"ffffff\";s:16:\"separator_shadow\";s:6:\"f4f4f4\";s:16:\"separator_height\";i:100;s:18:\"separator_position\";s:3:\"top\";s:16:\"separator_tablet\";s:2:\"no\";s:23:\"separator_height_tablet\";s:0:\"\";s:16:\"separator_mobile\";s:2:\"no\";s:23:\"separator_height_mobile\";s:0:\"\";s:21:\"separator_type_bottom\";s:4:\"none\";s:22:\"separator_color_bottom\";s:6:\"ffffff\";s:23:\"separator_shadow_bottom\";s:6:\"f4f4f4\";s:23:\"separator_height_bottom\";i:100;s:23:\"separator_tablet_bottom\";s:2:\"no\";s:30:\"separator_height_tablet_bottom\";s:0:\"\";s:23:\"separator_mobile_bottom\";s:2:\"no\";s:30:\"separator_height_mobile_bottom\";s:0:\"\";s:17:\"enable_expandable\";s:2:\"no\";s:8:\"er_title\";s:38:\"Hier klicken um die Reihe zu erweitern\";s:10:\"er_title_e\";s:39:\"Hier klicken um die Reihe einzuklappen.\";s:19:\"er_transition_speed\";i:500;s:16:\"er_default_state\";s:9:\"collapsed\";s:13:\"er_title_font\";a:2:{s:6:\"family\";s:7:\"Default\";s:6:\"weight\";i:400;}s:18:\"er_title_font_size\";i:18;s:13:\"er_title_case\";s:7:\"default\";s:14:\"er_title_color\";s:0:\"\";s:15:\"er_title_margin\";a:2:{s:6:\"bottom\";i:0;s:5:\"right\";i:0;}s:12:\"er_arrow_pos\";s:6:\"bottom\";s:13:\"er_arrow_size\";i:12;s:15:\"er_arrow_weight\";s:4:\"bold\";s:14:\"er_arrow_color\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"er_arrow_bg\";s:0:\"\";s:15:\"er_arrow_border\";i:0;s:21:\"er_arrow_border_color\";s:0:\"\";s:20:\"er_arrow_padding_all\";a:4:{s:3:\"top\";i:0;s:6:\"bottom\";i:0;s:4:\"left\";i:0;s:5:\"right\";i:0;}s:15:\"er_arrow_radius\";i:0;s:11:\"er_bg_color\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"er_bg_opacity\";i:1;s:16:\"er_title_padding\";a:2:{s:3:\"top\";i:18;s:6:\"bottom\";i:18;}s:17:\"enable_down_arrow\";s:2:\"no\";s:19:\"da_transition_speed\";i:500;s:13:\"da_top_offset\";i:0;s:12:\"da_animation\";s:2:\"no\";s:14:\"da_hide_mobile\";s:2:\"no\";s:15:\"da_arrow_weight\";s:5:\"light\";s:14:\"da_arrow_color\";a:2:{s:7:\"primary\";s:6:\"000000\";s:9:\"secondary\";s:6:\"000000\";}s:11:\"da_arrow_bg\";a:2:{s:7:\"primary\";s:6:\"f4f4f4\";s:9:\"secondary\";s:6:\"f4f4f4\";}s:15:\"da_arrow_border\";i:0;s:21:\"da_arrow_border_color\";a:2:{s:7:\"primary\";s:6:\"000000\";s:9:\"secondary\";s:6:\"000000\";}s:16:\"da_arrow_padding\";i:0;s:15:\"da_arrow_margin\";a:2:{s:3:\"top\";i:0;s:6:\"bottom\";i:30;}s:15:\"da_arrow_radius\";i:0;s:18:\"responsive_display\";s:0:\"\";s:18:\"visibility_display\";s:0:\"\";s:26:\"visibility_user_capability\";s:0:\"\";s:2:\"id\";s:0:\"\";s:5:\"class\";s:0:\"\";s:10:\"border_top\";s:0:\"\";s:17:\"border_top_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:21:\"border_top_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:12:\"border_right\";s:0:\"\";s:19:\"border_right_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:23:\"border_right_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"border_bottom\";s:0:\"\";s:20:\"border_bottom_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:24:\"border_bottom_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"border_left\";s:0:\"\";s:18:\"border_left_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:22:\"border_left_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:10:\"margin_top\";s:0:\"\";s:17:\"margin_top_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:21:\"margin_top_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:12:\"margin_right\";s:0:\"\";s:19:\"margin_right_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:23:\"margin_right_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"margin_bottom\";s:0:\"\";s:20:\"margin_bottom_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:24:\"margin_bottom_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"margin_left\";s:0:\"\";s:18:\"margin_left_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:22:\"margin_left_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"padding_top\";s:0:\"\";s:18:\"padding_top_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:22:\"padding_top_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"padding_right\";s:0:\"\";s:20:\"padding_right_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:24:\"padding_right_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:14:\"padding_bottom\";s:0:\"\";s:21:\"padding_bottom_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:25:\"padding_bottom_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:12:\"padding_left\";s:0:\"\";s:19:\"padding_left_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:23:\"padding_left_responsive\";s:0:\"\";}}s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c2b4f\";O:8:\"stdClass\":5:{s:4:\"node\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c2b4f\";s:4:\"type\";s:12:\"column-group\";s:6:\"parent\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c24c0\";s:8:\"position\";i:0;s:8:\"settings\";s:0:\"\";}s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c2ca2\";O:8:\"stdClass\":5:{s:4:\"node\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c2ca2\";s:4:\"type\";s:6:\"column\";s:6:\"parent\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c2b4f\";s:8:\"position\";i:0;s:8:\"settings\";O:8:\"stdClass\":1:{s:4:\"size\";i:100;}}s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c436c\";O:8:\"stdClass\":5:{s:4:\"node\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c436c\";s:4:\"type\";s:6:\"module\";s:6:\"parent\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c2ca2\";s:8:\"position\";i:0;s:8:\"settings\";O:8:\"stdClass\":21:{s:4:\"text\";s:9018:\"Daten sind in der heutigen digitalen Ökonomie so bedeutsam, dass viele BeobachterInnen von ihnen als „Öl des 21. Jahrhunderts“ sprechen. Diejenigen Unternehmen, die am meisten Daten sammeln, haben einen entscheidenden Wettbewerbsvorteil. Die ertragreichen Geschäftsmodelle von Internetriesen wie Google, Amazon oder Facebook basieren darauf, NutzerInnen miteinander in Interaktion zu bringen und dadurch große Mengen von wertvollen Daten zu generieren. Diese Grundstruktur der Datenökonomie beschreibt Marion Fourcade als einen faustischen Pakt – im Tausch für die kostenfreien Dienste im Internet müssen wir unsere Seele in Form unserer Privatsphäre preisgeben.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nAm 7. Mai 2018 führte Marion Fourcade die Redenreihe Making Sense of the Digital Society fort. Fourcade ist Professorin für Soziologie an der University of California in Berkeley und Direktorin am Max Planck-Science Po Center on Coping with Instability in Market Society in Paris. In ihrem bald erscheinendem Buch „The Ordinal Society“ beschäftigt sie sich mit neuen Formen sozialer Stratifizierung und Moral in der digitalen Ökonomie.\r\n\r\nPassenderweise legte Marion Fourcade nur wenige Tage nach Karl Marx 200. Geburtstag den Fokus auf Fragen der sozialen Ungleichheit und Exklusion in der digitalen Gesellschaft. In ihrem Vortrag zur Sozialordnung der digitalen Gesellschaft setzte sie sich mit den sozialen Folgen der heutigen Datensammelpraktiken auseinander.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nDas ökonomische Interesse an persönlichen Daten besteht nicht erst seit der Digitalisierung, hält Fourcade fest. Das Kreditwesen in den USA begann bereits in den 1840er Jahren, Informationen über HändlerInnen zu sammeln, um deren Kreditwürdigkeit zu evaluieren. In den 1870ern wurde damit begonnen, Informationen über KonsumentInnen zu nutzen. In den 1970er und 80er Jahren fand eine Konzentration des Kreditauskunftswesens statt, die mit der zeitgleich stattfindenden Computerisierung dafür sorgte, dass immer präzisere finanzielle Identitäten entstanden. So entstand eine immer differenzierte Klassifizierung von Personen, welche die Bedingungen zur Vergabe eines Kredits festlegte – der sogenannte „Credit Score“ war geboren. Das für die digitale Gesellschaft charakteristische Modell individualisierter Profile hat also seinen Ursprung im Finanzwesen. Die Logik der Quantifizierbarkeit und Effizienzsteigerung breitet sich nun auf weitere Bereiche – wie den Versicherungs-, Gesundheits- oder den Arbeitsmarkt – aus, und beeinflusst unsere Lebenschancen in vielerlei Hinsicht.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nhttps://twitter.com/ckatzenbach/status/993547156937158657\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nAls gesellschaftliche Implikation dieser Entwicklung diagnostiziert Fourcade das Entstehen eines Regimes der Sichtbarkeit. Im digitalen Zeitalter werden unsere Möglichkeiten der Quantifizierung und Evaluierung unserer Tätigkeiten zu entkommen zunehmend geringer. Eine Gesellschaft von gläsernen Bürgern entsteht. Transparenz entsteht hierbei jedoch nur einseitig. Denn während wir immer transparenter werden, wird der Umgang der Unternehmen mit unseren Daten immer undurchsichtiger. Der Versuch sich diesem Trend durch eine Rückkehr zum Analogen zu entziehen, scheint keine gangbare Lösung darzustellen. Ganz im Gegenteil kann Unsichtbarkeit sogar negative Konsequenzen mit sich bringen: Denn auch dies ist eine Art von evaluierbarem Verhalten und stellt für viele Klassifizierungssysteme eine nicht-vertrauenswürdige Kategorie dar.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nhttps://twitter.com/NelliPiattoeva/status/993551110207102976\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nEine US-Wissenschaftlerin, die im Selbstversuch ihre Schwangerschaft zu verbergen versuchte, indem sie ausschließlich mit Bargeld bezahlte, geriet beispielsweise ins Visier der Polizei, als sie mit einem Amazon-Warengutschein im Wert von 500 Dollar bezahlen wollte. Das Bezahlen mit Bargeld gilt in den USA als Merkmal von Personen mit geringem Einkommen. Deshalb wird es mit Kriminalität – wie zum Beispiel im konkreten Fall mit Geldwäsche – in Verbindung gebracht. Menschen, die in diese Kategorie fallen, leiden daher oft unter struktureller Diskriminierung. Marion Fourcade tauft diese Gruppe in Anlehnung an Karl Marx „Lumpenscoretariat“.\r\n\r\n \r\n
\r\n

She said it! Lumpenscoretariat, my favourite word from Marion Fourcade ❤ @hiig_berlin @bpb_de lecture series pic.twitter.com/5O1RFVTttF

\r\n— Lena Ulbricht (@lena_ulbricht) 7. Mai 2018
\r\n\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nVieles von dem, was in früheren Zeiten im privaten Raum verborgen blieb, ist heute sichtbar. Pierre Bourdieu folgend spricht Fourcade dabei von einer neu entstandenen Kapitalform, dem „Ubercapital“. Dieses ist zunächst einmal eine ironische Anspielung auf das Online-Dienstleistungsunternehmen Uber. Zugleich verweist es jedoch auf das deutsche Wort über – als Metakategorie und Verweis auf dessen Überlegenheit gegenüber individueller Selbstbestimmung. Als aggregierte Evaluierung unserer digitalen Spuren bestimmt das Ubercapital unsere Position im sozialen Raum, entzieht sich jedoch weitestgehend unserer eigenen Einsicht und Kontrolle. Dadurch entscheidet es zunehmend über unseren Zugang zu Gütern, Dienstleistungen und letztlich auch über unsere Lebenschancen.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nhttps://twitter.com/felix_beer/status/993555017381679104\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nEffizienz und Profite entstehen in der digitalen Gesellschaft dadurch, dass Menschen basierend auf algorithmischer Auswertung klassifiziert werden. Individuen geraten so zunehmend unter Druck, sich in ihrem Verhalten anzupassen und zu optimieren. Damit ist die digitale Ordnung der Klassifizierung auch eine moralische.\r\n\r\nZugleich verbergen sich in der Konzeption der Algorithmen oft strukturelle Diskriminierungen, wodurch Ubercapital die Tendenz aufweist, bereits bestehende soziale Ungleichheiten weiter zu verstärken. Das orwellianische Potential der neuen digitalen Möglichkeiten sozialer Kontrolle ist derzeit in China zu beobachten. Dort erprobt die Regierung derzeit einen „Social Score“, der verschiedene Datenbanken zusammenführt, um das Verhalten von Unternehmen, Personen und Organisation ganzheitlich zu bewerten. Der Score entscheidet letztlich über den Zugang zu Leistungen und Gütern.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nhttps://twitter.com/tweetbaack/status/993556086845247489\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nDie sich aus dieser Bewertungsökonomie ergebenden Ungerechtigkeiten und Formen der Exklusion zu politisieren, ist schwerer als in früheren Zeiten. Personen werden nicht mehr anhand von greif- und erfahrbaren Unterscheidungen – wie beispielsweise klassenspezifischen Statusmerkmalen – erfasst, sondern mittels eines scheinbar unsichtbaren und oft opaken Klassifizierungssystems individuell sortiert. Das Entstehen solidarischer Bande, die durch einen gemeinsamen sozialen Status oder durch geteilte Exklusionserfahrungen geknüpft werden können, wird so deutlich erschwert. Im Gegenteil vermittelt die moralisierende Logik des Ubercapitals dem Individuum ein Gefühl der Eigenverantwortung für die eigene Lage und sich eventuell ergebende Benachteiligungen.\r\n\r\n[photospace ids=\"47298,47296,47294,47292,47284,47286,47288,47290,47282,47280,47278\"]\r\n\r\nHistorisch betrachtet mussten Menschen die Grundlage für kollektives Handeln immer erst aktiv schaffen, wie etwa durch die Erarbeitung eines geteilten Verständnisses über ihre gemeinsame Lage. Erst daraus können sich Narrative speisen, die politische Mobilisierung ermöglichen. Aufgrund dessen ist die derzeitige Debatte über die Digitalisierung und ihre gesellschaftlichen Implikationen so relevant: Sie ist ein erster Schritt für die Lösung neu entstehender Ungerechtigkeiten und Formen der Exklusion in der digitalen Gesellschaft.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nDie Redenreihe Making Sense of the Digital Society wird am 24. September 2018 mit Stephen Graham fortgesetzt. Wenn Sie auf dem Laufenden bleiben möchten, können Sie hier unseren Veranstaltungsnewsletter abonnieren.\r\n\r\n \";s:18:\"responsive_display\";s:0:\"\";s:18:\"visibility_display\";s:0:\"\";s:26:\"visibility_user_capability\";s:0:\"\";s:9:\"animation\";s:0:\"\";s:15:\"animation_delay\";s:3:\"0.0\";s:2:\"id\";s:0:\"\";s:5:\"class\";s:0:\"\";s:10:\"margin_top\";s:0:\"\";s:17:\"margin_top_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:21:\"margin_top_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:12:\"margin_right\";s:0:\"\";s:19:\"margin_right_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:23:\"margin_right_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"margin_bottom\";s:0:\"\";s:20:\"margin_bottom_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:24:\"margin_bottom_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"margin_left\";s:0:\"\";s:18:\"margin_left_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:22:\"margin_left_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:4:\"type\";s:9:\"rich-text\";}}}"],"_oembed_a49968b1519d08100763f578deb318c4":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_a49968b1519d08100763f578deb318c4":["1530775017"],"_oembed_2758a8ef5a3993ca51155d9bb807761a":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_2758a8ef5a3993ca51155d9bb807761a":["1530775017"],"_oembed_5ad9dc2848d89b829c118195a386750c":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_5ad9dc2848d89b829c118195a386750c":["1530775017"],"_oembed_1c3edc78d2f5c939d8e64d330e4ecc8f":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_1c3edc78d2f5c939d8e64d330e4ecc8f":["1530775017"],"_oembed_18d58103e37f91d0e38b3a56add663de":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_18d58103e37f91d0e38b3a56add663de":["1531389613"],"_oembed_97e593409beaeefed7f45a8e7ecc4958":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_d294a762f616a1d037dae476bfeca52d":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_97e593409beaeefed7f45a8e7ecc4958":["1531389613"],"_oembed_time_d294a762f616a1d037dae476bfeca52d":["1531389613"],"_oembed_2763f3275b3d05bad0dead9bef2a217f":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_2763f3275b3d05bad0dead9bef2a217f":["1531389614"]}},"jobLocation":{"@type":"Place","address":{"@type":"PostalAddress","streetAddress":"Französische Straße 9","addressLocality":"Berlin","addressRegion":"Berlin","PostalCode":"10117","addressCountry":"Germany"}},"baseSalary":{"@type":"MonetaryAmount","value":{"@type":"QuantitativeValue"}},"estimatedSalary":{"@type":"MonetaryAmount","value":{"@type":"QuantitativeValue"}},"title":"Die Sozialordnung der digitalen Gesellschaft","description":"Daten sind in der heutigen digitalen Ökonomie so bedeutsam, dass viele BeobachterInnen von ihnen als „Öl des 21. Jahrhunderts“ sprechen. Diejenigen Unternehmen, die am meisten Daten sammeln, haben einen entscheidenden Wettbewerbsvorteil. Die ertragreichen Geschäftsmodelle von Internetriesen wie Google, Amazon oder Facebook basieren darauf, NutzerInnen miteinander in Interaktion zu bringen und dadurch große Mengen von wertvollen Daten zu generieren. Diese Grundstruktur der Datenökonomie beschreibt Marion Fourcade als einen faustischen Pakt – im Tausch für die kostenfreien Dienste im Internet müssen wir unsere Seele in Form unserer Privatsphäre preisgeben.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nAm 7. Mai 2018 führte Marion Fourcade die Redenreihe Making Sense of the Digital Society fort. Fourcade ist Professorin für Soziologie an der University of California in Berkeley und Direktorin am Max Planck-Science Po Center on Coping with Instability in Market Society in Paris. In ihrem bald erscheinendem Buch „The Ordinal Society“ beschäftigt sie sich mit neuen Formen sozialer Stratifizierung und Moral in der digitalen Ökonomie.\r\n\r\nPassenderweise legte Marion Fourcade nur wenige Tage nach Karl Marx 200. Geburtstag den Fokus auf Fragen der sozialen Ungleichheit und Exklusion in der digitalen Gesellschaft. In ihrem Vortrag zur Sozialordnung der digitalen Gesellschaft setzte sie sich mit den sozialen Folgen der heutigen Datensammelpraktiken auseinander.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nDas ökonomische Interesse an persönlichen Daten besteht nicht erst seit der Digitalisierung, hält Fourcade fest. Das Kreditwesen in den USA begann bereits in den 1840er Jahren, Informationen über HändlerInnen zu sammeln, um deren Kreditwürdigkeit zu evaluieren. In den 1870ern wurde damit begonnen, Informationen über KonsumentInnen zu nutzen. In den 1970er und 80er Jahren fand eine Konzentration des Kreditauskunftswesens statt, die mit der zeitgleich stattfindenden Computerisierung dafür sorgte, dass immer präzisere finanzielle Identitäten entstanden. So entstand eine immer differenzierte Klassifizierung von Personen, welche die Bedingungen zur Vergabe eines Kredits festlegte – der sogenannte „Credit Score“ war geboren. Das für die digitale Gesellschaft charakteristische Modell individualisierter Profile hat also seinen Ursprung im Finanzwesen. Die Logik der Quantifizierbarkeit und Effizienzsteigerung breitet sich nun auf weitere Bereiche – wie den Versicherungs-, Gesundheits- oder den Arbeitsmarkt – aus, und beeinflusst unsere Lebenschancen in vielerlei Hinsicht.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nhttps://twitter.com/ckatzenbach/status/993547156937158657\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nAls gesellschaftliche Implikation dieser Entwicklung diagnostiziert Fourcade das Entstehen eines Regimes der Sichtbarkeit. Im digitalen Zeitalter werden unsere Möglichkeiten der Quantifizierung und Evaluierung unserer Tätigkeiten zu entkommen zunehmend geringer. Eine Gesellschaft von gläsernen Bürgern entsteht. Transparenz entsteht hierbei jedoch nur einseitig. Denn während wir immer transparenter werden, wird der Umgang der Unternehmen mit unseren Daten immer undurchsichtiger. Der Versuch sich diesem Trend durch eine Rückkehr zum Analogen zu entziehen, scheint keine gangbare Lösung darzustellen. Ganz im Gegenteil kann Unsichtbarkeit sogar negative Konsequenzen mit sich bringen: Denn auch dies ist eine Art von evaluierbarem Verhalten und stellt für viele Klassifizierungssysteme eine nicht-vertrauenswürdige Kategorie dar.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nhttps://twitter.com/NelliPiattoeva/status/993551110207102976\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nEine US-Wissenschaftlerin, die im Selbstversuch ihre Schwangerschaft zu verbergen versuchte, indem sie ausschließlich mit Bargeld bezahlte, geriet beispielsweise ins Visier der Polizei, als sie mit einem Amazon-Warengutschein im Wert von 500 Dollar bezahlen wollte. Das Bezahlen mit Bargeld gilt in den USA als Merkmal von Personen mit geringem Einkommen. Deshalb wird es mit Kriminalität – wie zum Beispiel im konkreten Fall mit Geldwäsche – in Verbindung gebracht. Menschen, die in diese Kategorie fallen, leiden daher oft unter struktureller Diskriminierung. Marion Fourcade tauft diese Gruppe in Anlehnung an Karl Marx „Lumpenscoretariat“.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nShe said it! Lumpenscoretariat, my favourite word from Marion Fourcade ❤ @hiig_berlin @bpb_de lecture series pic.twitter.com/5O1RFVTttF\r\n— Lena Ulbricht (@lena_ulbricht) 7. Mai 2018\r\n\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nVieles von dem, was in früheren Zeiten im privaten Raum verborgen blieb, ist heute sichtbar. Pierre Bourdieu folgend spricht Fourcade dabei von einer neu entstandenen Kapitalform, dem „Überkapital“. Dieses ist zunächst einmal eine ironische Anspielung auf das Online-Dienstleistungsunternehmen Uber. Zugleich verweist es jedoch auf das deutsche Wort über – als Metakategorie und Verweis auf dessen Überlegenheit gegenüber individueller Selbstbestimmung. Als aggregierte Evaluierung unserer digitalen Spuren bestimmt das Überkapital unsere Position im sozialen Raum, entzieht sich jedoch weitestgehend unserer eigenen Einsicht und Kontrolle. Dadurch entscheidet es zunehmend über unseren Zugang zu Gütern, Dienstleistungen und letztlich auch über unsere Lebenschancen.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nhttps://twitter.com/felix_beer/status/993555017381679104\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nEffizienz und Profite entstehen in der digitalen Gesellschaft dadurch, dass Menschen basierend auf algorithmischer Auswertung klassifiziert werden. Individuen geraten so zunehmend unter Druck, sich in ihrem Verhalten anzupassen und zu optimieren. Damit ist die digitale Ordnung der Klassifizierung auch eine moralische.\r\n\r\nZugleich verbergen sich in der Konzeption der Algorithmen oft strukturelle Diskriminierungen, wodurch Überkapital die Tendenz aufweist, bereits bestehende soziale Ungleichheiten weiter zu verstärken. Das orwellianische Potential der neuen digitalen Möglichkeiten sozialer Kontrolle ist derzeit in China zu beobachten. Dort erprobt die Regierung derzeit einen „Social Score“, der verschiedene Datenbanken zusammenführt, um das Verhalten von Unternehmen, Personen und Organisation ganzheitlich zu bewerten. Der Score entscheidet letztlich über den Zugang zu Leistungen und Gütern.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nhttps://twitter.com/tweetbaack/status/993556086845247489\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nDie sich aus dieser Bewertungsökonomie ergebenden Ungerechtigkeiten und Formen der Exklusion zu politisieren, ist schwerer als in früheren Zeiten. Personen werden nicht mehr anhand von greif- und erfahrbaren Unterscheidungen – wie beispielsweise klassenspezifischen Statusmerkmalen – erfasst, sondern mittels eines scheinbar unsichtbaren und oft opaken Klassifizierungssystems individuell sortiert. Das Entstehen solidarischer Bande, die durch einen gemeinsamen sozialen Status oder durch geteilte Exklusionserfahrungen geknüpft werden können, wird so deutlich erschwert. Im Gegenteil vermittelt die moralisierende Logik des Überkapitals dem Individuum ein Gefühl der Eigenverantwortung für die eigene Lage und sich eventuell ergebende Benachteiligungen.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nHistorisch betrachtet mussten Menschen die Grundlage für kollektives Handeln immer erst aktiv schaffen, wie etwa durch die Erarbeitung eines geteilten Verständnisses über ihre gemeinsame Lage. Erst daraus können sich Narrative speisen, die politische Mobilisierung ermöglichen. Aufgrund dessen ist die derzeitige Debatte über die Digitalisierung und ihre gesellschaftlichen Implikationen so relevant: Sie ist ein erster Schritt für die Lösung neu entstehender Ungerechtigkeiten und Formen der Exklusion in der digitalen Gesellschaft.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nDie Redenreihe Making Sense of the Digital Society wird am 24. September 2018 mit Stephen Graham fortgesetzt. Wenn Sie auf dem Laufenden bleiben möchten, können Sie hier unseren Veranstaltungsnewsletter abonnieren.\r\n\r\n ","url":"https://www.hiig.de/die-sozialordnung-der-digitalen-gesellschaft/","employmentType":{"_edit_lock":["1531391074:127"],"_edit_last":["127"],"_wpml_media_duplicate":["1"],"_wpml_media_featured":["1"],"_oembed_8ed7d0b2371ff0fd3775247967c9b3f2":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_8ed7d0b2371ff0fd3775247967c9b3f2":["1530018716"],"_oembed_0cb1c9aa104c6209918ce72fc8a754b4":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_0cb1c9aa104c6209918ce72fc8a754b4":["1530018716"],"_oembed_be676377a29207a34a945a4bdffc5338":["

She said it! Lumpenscoretariat, my favourite word from Marion Fourcade ❤ @hiig_berlin @bpb_de lecture series pic.twitter.com/5O1RFVTttF

— Lena Ulbricht (@lena_ulbricht) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_be676377a29207a34a945a4bdffc5338":["1530018716"],"_oembed_8eafdbae1dc59b6c911c402cd5e8be3b":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_8eafdbae1dc59b6c911c402cd5e8be3b":["1530018716"],"_oembed_f4ae0214e41f1a211cec9e77fb593b30":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_f4ae0214e41f1a211cec9e77fb593b30":["1530018716"],"_wp_page_template":["default"],"page_contacts":["a:2:{s:5:\"title\";s:0:\"\";s:4:\"text\";s:0:\"\";}"],"_yoast_wpseo_content_score":["30"],"post_doi":["10.5281/zenodo.1303313"],"_post_doi":["post_doi"],"_oembed_0bb1be6aa2f71136578b079ef5cc7018":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_0bb1be6aa2f71136578b079ef5cc7018":["1531391077"],"_oembed_6d280ece8ad9316d2157330e4f4a987e":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_6d280ece8ad9316d2157330e4f4a987e":["1531391077"],"_oembed_57b4ff5bfeadc1f813fe66c950c6cb1c":["

She said it! Lumpenscoretariat, my favourite word from Marion Fourcade ❤ @hiig_berlin @bpb_de lecture series pic.twitter.com/5O1RFVTttF

— Lena Ulbricht (@lena_ulbricht) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_57b4ff5bfeadc1f813fe66c950c6cb1c":["1530018838"],"_oembed_da667d9607186a00cfac7cb6bc2f8c44":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_da667d9607186a00cfac7cb6bc2f8c44":["1531391077"],"_oembed_3b18bd3d577947df0415c7cab7c997ae":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_3b18bd3d577947df0415c7cab7c997ae":["1531391077"],"_yoast_wpseo_primary_category":["52"],"ampforwp_custom_content_editor":[""],"ampforwp_custom_content_editor_checkbox":[null],"ampforwp-amp-on-off":["default"],"ampforwp-redirection-on-off":["enable"],"_oembed_257eebea6c31d11dd16c2a10d2a7c799":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_257eebea6c31d11dd16c2a10d2a7c799":["1530018848"],"_oembed_c63d853e34ec8a3b0cbe133e8364cb13":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_c63d853e34ec8a3b0cbe133e8364cb13":["1530018848"],"_oembed_3082bdee7a4e9feef7b5965313e6eb7b":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_3082bdee7a4e9feef7b5965313e6eb7b":["1530018848"],"_oembed_7e3a4a2fc56c25b0b0ca8767f42786a4":["

She said it! Lumpenscoretariat, my favourite word from Marion Fourcade ❤ @hiig_berlin @bpb_de lecture series pic.twitter.com/5O1RFVTttF

— Lena Ulbricht (@lena_ulbricht) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_7e3a4a2fc56c25b0b0ca8767f42786a4":["1530018849"],"_oembed_bdefc4ec6f338cc743590b8f552aa3a6":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_bdefc4ec6f338cc743590b8f552aa3a6":["1530018849"],"_oembed_c5c835e55b6ec27304a09b2c8514ad77":["
Newsletter Anmeldung
"],"_oembed_time_c5c835e55b6ec27304a09b2c8514ad77":["1530021381"],"_thumbnail_id":["49223"],"_oembed_0c0a40e93ba747ad6c419564f57295ce":["

She said it! Lumpenscoretariat, my favourite word from Marion Fourcade ❤ @hiig_berlin @bpb_de lecture series pic.twitter.com/5O1RFVTttF

— Lena Ulbricht (@lena_ulbricht) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_0c0a40e93ba747ad6c419564f57295ce":["1530030163"],"_oembed_dfc2c8255096359c59ab60745da60711":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_dfc2c8255096359c59ab60745da60711":["1530187813"],"_oembed_890fdec77ff0c14bad46b56962c591cc":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_890fdec77ff0c14bad46b56962c591cc":["1530187813"],"_oembed_cf40150bd571a281c3a2b3e26a043a21":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_cf40150bd571a281c3a2b3e26a043a21":["1530187813"],"_oembed_8825224377a6f306f55d5ad09663fdea":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_8825224377a6f306f55d5ad09663fdea":["1530187813"],"_oembed_c0e1fd068fb864858570a0a76e132434":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_c0e1fd068fb864858570a0a76e132434":["1530621009"],"_oembed_65e24a2772e55215c71a07d8b5fffda5":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_65e24a2772e55215c71a07d8b5fffda5":["1530621009"],"_oembed_bbb5db6a03e5e4b6e873b8bf1268b6c8":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_bbb5db6a03e5e4b6e873b8bf1268b6c8":["1530621009"],"_oembed_71a52e268c91b631fc40a8f018dc1c81":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_71a52e268c91b631fc40a8f018dc1c81":["1530621009"],"_fl_builder_draft":["a:4:{s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c24c0\";O:8:\"stdClass\":5:{s:4:\"node\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c24c0\";s:4:\"type\";s:3:\"row\";s:6:\"parent\";N;s:8:\"position\";i:0;s:8:\"settings\";O:8:\"stdClass\":139:{s:5:\"width\";s:5:\"fixed\";s:13:\"content_width\";s:5:\"fixed\";s:17:\"max_content_width\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"full_height\";s:7:\"default\";s:17:\"content_alignment\";s:6:\"center\";s:10:\"text_color\";s:0:\"\";s:10:\"link_color\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"hover_color\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"heading_color\";s:0:\"\";s:7:\"bg_type\";s:4:\"none\";s:8:\"bg_image\";s:0:\"\";s:9:\"bg_repeat\";s:4:\"none\";s:11:\"bg_position\";s:13:\"center center\";s:13:\"bg_attachment\";s:6:\"scroll\";s:7:\"bg_size\";s:5:\"cover\";s:15:\"bg_video_source\";s:9:\"wordpress\";s:8:\"bg_video\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"bg_video_webm\";s:0:\"\";s:16:\"bg_video_url_mp4\";s:0:\"\";s:17:\"bg_video_url_webm\";s:0:\"\";s:20:\"bg_video_service_url\";s:0:\"\";s:14:\"bg_video_audio\";s:2:\"no\";s:17:\"bg_video_fallback\";s:0:\"\";s:9:\"ss_source\";s:9:\"wordpress\";s:9:\"ss_photos\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"ss_feed_url\";s:0:\"\";s:8:\"ss_speed\";s:1:\"3\";s:13:\"ss_transition\";s:4:\"fade\";s:21:\"ss_transitionDuration\";s:1:\"1\";s:12:\"ss_randomize\";s:5:\"false\";s:17:\"bg_parallax_image\";s:0:\"\";s:17:\"bg_parallax_speed\";s:4:\"fast\";s:8:\"bg_color\";s:0:\"\";s:10:\"bg_opacity\";s:3:\"100\";s:18:\"pp_bg_overlay_type\";s:10:\"full_width\";s:16:\"bg_overlay_color\";s:0:\"\";s:21:\"pp_bg_overlay_color_2\";s:0:\"\";s:23:\"pp_bg_overlay_direction\";s:6:\"bottom\";s:18:\"bg_overlay_opacity\";s:2:\"50\";s:13:\"gradient_type\";s:6:\"linear\";s:14:\"gradient_color\";a:2:{s:7:\"primary\";s:6:\"d81660\";s:9:\"secondary\";s:6:\"7d22bd\";}s:16:\"linear_direction\";s:6:\"bottom\";s:11:\"border_type\";s:0:\"\";s:12:\"border_color\";s:0:\"\";s:14:\"border_opacity\";s:3:\"100\";s:16:\"enable_separator\";s:2:\"no\";s:14:\"separator_type\";s:4:\"none\";s:15:\"separator_color\";s:6:\"ffffff\";s:16:\"separator_shadow\";s:6:\"f4f4f4\";s:16:\"separator_height\";i:100;s:18:\"separator_position\";s:3:\"top\";s:16:\"separator_tablet\";s:2:\"no\";s:23:\"separator_height_tablet\";s:0:\"\";s:16:\"separator_mobile\";s:2:\"no\";s:23:\"separator_height_mobile\";s:0:\"\";s:21:\"separator_type_bottom\";s:4:\"none\";s:22:\"separator_color_bottom\";s:6:\"ffffff\";s:23:\"separator_shadow_bottom\";s:6:\"f4f4f4\";s:23:\"separator_height_bottom\";i:100;s:23:\"separator_tablet_bottom\";s:2:\"no\";s:30:\"separator_height_tablet_bottom\";s:0:\"\";s:23:\"separator_mobile_bottom\";s:2:\"no\";s:30:\"separator_height_mobile_bottom\";s:0:\"\";s:17:\"enable_expandable\";s:2:\"no\";s:8:\"er_title\";s:38:\"Hier klicken um die Reihe zu erweitern\";s:10:\"er_title_e\";s:39:\"Hier klicken um die Reihe einzuklappen.\";s:19:\"er_transition_speed\";i:500;s:16:\"er_default_state\";s:9:\"collapsed\";s:13:\"er_title_font\";a:2:{s:6:\"family\";s:7:\"Default\";s:6:\"weight\";i:400;}s:18:\"er_title_font_size\";i:18;s:13:\"er_title_case\";s:7:\"default\";s:14:\"er_title_color\";s:0:\"\";s:15:\"er_title_margin\";a:2:{s:6:\"bottom\";i:0;s:5:\"right\";i:0;}s:12:\"er_arrow_pos\";s:6:\"bottom\";s:13:\"er_arrow_size\";i:12;s:15:\"er_arrow_weight\";s:4:\"bold\";s:14:\"er_arrow_color\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"er_arrow_bg\";s:0:\"\";s:15:\"er_arrow_border\";i:0;s:21:\"er_arrow_border_color\";s:0:\"\";s:20:\"er_arrow_padding_all\";a:4:{s:3:\"top\";i:0;s:6:\"bottom\";i:0;s:4:\"left\";i:0;s:5:\"right\";i:0;}s:15:\"er_arrow_radius\";i:0;s:11:\"er_bg_color\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"er_bg_opacity\";i:1;s:16:\"er_title_padding\";a:2:{s:3:\"top\";i:18;s:6:\"bottom\";i:18;}s:17:\"enable_down_arrow\";s:2:\"no\";s:19:\"da_transition_speed\";i:500;s:13:\"da_top_offset\";i:0;s:12:\"da_animation\";s:2:\"no\";s:14:\"da_hide_mobile\";s:2:\"no\";s:15:\"da_arrow_weight\";s:5:\"light\";s:14:\"da_arrow_color\";a:2:{s:7:\"primary\";s:6:\"000000\";s:9:\"secondary\";s:6:\"000000\";}s:11:\"da_arrow_bg\";a:2:{s:7:\"primary\";s:6:\"f4f4f4\";s:9:\"secondary\";s:6:\"f4f4f4\";}s:15:\"da_arrow_border\";i:0;s:21:\"da_arrow_border_color\";a:2:{s:7:\"primary\";s:6:\"000000\";s:9:\"secondary\";s:6:\"000000\";}s:16:\"da_arrow_padding\";i:0;s:15:\"da_arrow_margin\";a:2:{s:3:\"top\";i:0;s:6:\"bottom\";i:30;}s:15:\"da_arrow_radius\";i:0;s:18:\"responsive_display\";s:0:\"\";s:18:\"visibility_display\";s:0:\"\";s:26:\"visibility_user_capability\";s:0:\"\";s:2:\"id\";s:0:\"\";s:5:\"class\";s:0:\"\";s:10:\"border_top\";s:0:\"\";s:17:\"border_top_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:21:\"border_top_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:12:\"border_right\";s:0:\"\";s:19:\"border_right_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:23:\"border_right_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"border_bottom\";s:0:\"\";s:20:\"border_bottom_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:24:\"border_bottom_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"border_left\";s:0:\"\";s:18:\"border_left_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:22:\"border_left_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:10:\"margin_top\";s:0:\"\";s:17:\"margin_top_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:21:\"margin_top_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:12:\"margin_right\";s:0:\"\";s:19:\"margin_right_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:23:\"margin_right_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"margin_bottom\";s:0:\"\";s:20:\"margin_bottom_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:24:\"margin_bottom_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"margin_left\";s:0:\"\";s:18:\"margin_left_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:22:\"margin_left_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"padding_top\";s:0:\"\";s:18:\"padding_top_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:22:\"padding_top_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"padding_right\";s:0:\"\";s:20:\"padding_right_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:24:\"padding_right_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:14:\"padding_bottom\";s:0:\"\";s:21:\"padding_bottom_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:25:\"padding_bottom_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:12:\"padding_left\";s:0:\"\";s:19:\"padding_left_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:23:\"padding_left_responsive\";s:0:\"\";}}s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c2b4f\";O:8:\"stdClass\":5:{s:4:\"node\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c2b4f\";s:4:\"type\";s:12:\"column-group\";s:6:\"parent\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c24c0\";s:8:\"position\";i:0;s:8:\"settings\";s:0:\"\";}s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c2ca2\";O:8:\"stdClass\":5:{s:4:\"node\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c2ca2\";s:4:\"type\";s:6:\"column\";s:6:\"parent\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c2b4f\";s:8:\"position\";i:0;s:8:\"settings\";O:8:\"stdClass\":1:{s:4:\"size\";i:100;}}s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c436c\";O:8:\"stdClass\":5:{s:4:\"node\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c436c\";s:4:\"type\";s:6:\"module\";s:6:\"parent\";s:13:\"5b3dc5c7c2ca2\";s:8:\"position\";i:0;s:8:\"settings\";O:8:\"stdClass\":21:{s:4:\"text\";s:9018:\"Daten sind in der heutigen digitalen Ökonomie so bedeutsam, dass viele BeobachterInnen von ihnen als „Öl des 21. Jahrhunderts“ sprechen. Diejenigen Unternehmen, die am meisten Daten sammeln, haben einen entscheidenden Wettbewerbsvorteil. Die ertragreichen Geschäftsmodelle von Internetriesen wie Google, Amazon oder Facebook basieren darauf, NutzerInnen miteinander in Interaktion zu bringen und dadurch große Mengen von wertvollen Daten zu generieren. Diese Grundstruktur der Datenökonomie beschreibt Marion Fourcade als einen faustischen Pakt – im Tausch für die kostenfreien Dienste im Internet müssen wir unsere Seele in Form unserer Privatsphäre preisgeben.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nAm 7. Mai 2018 führte Marion Fourcade die Redenreihe Making Sense of the Digital Society fort. Fourcade ist Professorin für Soziologie an der University of California in Berkeley und Direktorin am Max Planck-Science Po Center on Coping with Instability in Market Society in Paris. In ihrem bald erscheinendem Buch „The Ordinal Society“ beschäftigt sie sich mit neuen Formen sozialer Stratifizierung und Moral in der digitalen Ökonomie.\r\n\r\nPassenderweise legte Marion Fourcade nur wenige Tage nach Karl Marx 200. Geburtstag den Fokus auf Fragen der sozialen Ungleichheit und Exklusion in der digitalen Gesellschaft. In ihrem Vortrag zur Sozialordnung der digitalen Gesellschaft setzte sie sich mit den sozialen Folgen der heutigen Datensammelpraktiken auseinander.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nDas ökonomische Interesse an persönlichen Daten besteht nicht erst seit der Digitalisierung, hält Fourcade fest. Das Kreditwesen in den USA begann bereits in den 1840er Jahren, Informationen über HändlerInnen zu sammeln, um deren Kreditwürdigkeit zu evaluieren. In den 1870ern wurde damit begonnen, Informationen über KonsumentInnen zu nutzen. In den 1970er und 80er Jahren fand eine Konzentration des Kreditauskunftswesens statt, die mit der zeitgleich stattfindenden Computerisierung dafür sorgte, dass immer präzisere finanzielle Identitäten entstanden. So entstand eine immer differenzierte Klassifizierung von Personen, welche die Bedingungen zur Vergabe eines Kredits festlegte – der sogenannte „Credit Score“ war geboren. Das für die digitale Gesellschaft charakteristische Modell individualisierter Profile hat also seinen Ursprung im Finanzwesen. Die Logik der Quantifizierbarkeit und Effizienzsteigerung breitet sich nun auf weitere Bereiche – wie den Versicherungs-, Gesundheits- oder den Arbeitsmarkt – aus, und beeinflusst unsere Lebenschancen in vielerlei Hinsicht.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nhttps://twitter.com/ckatzenbach/status/993547156937158657\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nAls gesellschaftliche Implikation dieser Entwicklung diagnostiziert Fourcade das Entstehen eines Regimes der Sichtbarkeit. Im digitalen Zeitalter werden unsere Möglichkeiten der Quantifizierung und Evaluierung unserer Tätigkeiten zu entkommen zunehmend geringer. Eine Gesellschaft von gläsernen Bürgern entsteht. Transparenz entsteht hierbei jedoch nur einseitig. Denn während wir immer transparenter werden, wird der Umgang der Unternehmen mit unseren Daten immer undurchsichtiger. Der Versuch sich diesem Trend durch eine Rückkehr zum Analogen zu entziehen, scheint keine gangbare Lösung darzustellen. Ganz im Gegenteil kann Unsichtbarkeit sogar negative Konsequenzen mit sich bringen: Denn auch dies ist eine Art von evaluierbarem Verhalten und stellt für viele Klassifizierungssysteme eine nicht-vertrauenswürdige Kategorie dar.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nhttps://twitter.com/NelliPiattoeva/status/993551110207102976\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nEine US-Wissenschaftlerin, die im Selbstversuch ihre Schwangerschaft zu verbergen versuchte, indem sie ausschließlich mit Bargeld bezahlte, geriet beispielsweise ins Visier der Polizei, als sie mit einem Amazon-Warengutschein im Wert von 500 Dollar bezahlen wollte. Das Bezahlen mit Bargeld gilt in den USA als Merkmal von Personen mit geringem Einkommen. Deshalb wird es mit Kriminalität – wie zum Beispiel im konkreten Fall mit Geldwäsche – in Verbindung gebracht. Menschen, die in diese Kategorie fallen, leiden daher oft unter struktureller Diskriminierung. Marion Fourcade tauft diese Gruppe in Anlehnung an Karl Marx „Lumpenscoretariat“.\r\n\r\n \r\n
\r\n

She said it! Lumpenscoretariat, my favourite word from Marion Fourcade ❤ @hiig_berlin @bpb_de lecture series pic.twitter.com/5O1RFVTttF

\r\n— Lena Ulbricht (@lena_ulbricht) 7. Mai 2018
\r\n\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nVieles von dem, was in früheren Zeiten im privaten Raum verborgen blieb, ist heute sichtbar. Pierre Bourdieu folgend spricht Fourcade dabei von einer neu entstandenen Kapitalform, dem „Ubercapital“. Dieses ist zunächst einmal eine ironische Anspielung auf das Online-Dienstleistungsunternehmen Uber. Zugleich verweist es jedoch auf das deutsche Wort über – als Metakategorie und Verweis auf dessen Überlegenheit gegenüber individueller Selbstbestimmung. Als aggregierte Evaluierung unserer digitalen Spuren bestimmt das Ubercapital unsere Position im sozialen Raum, entzieht sich jedoch weitestgehend unserer eigenen Einsicht und Kontrolle. Dadurch entscheidet es zunehmend über unseren Zugang zu Gütern, Dienstleistungen und letztlich auch über unsere Lebenschancen.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nhttps://twitter.com/felix_beer/status/993555017381679104\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nEffizienz und Profite entstehen in der digitalen Gesellschaft dadurch, dass Menschen basierend auf algorithmischer Auswertung klassifiziert werden. Individuen geraten so zunehmend unter Druck, sich in ihrem Verhalten anzupassen und zu optimieren. Damit ist die digitale Ordnung der Klassifizierung auch eine moralische.\r\n\r\nZugleich verbergen sich in der Konzeption der Algorithmen oft strukturelle Diskriminierungen, wodurch Ubercapital die Tendenz aufweist, bereits bestehende soziale Ungleichheiten weiter zu verstärken. Das orwellianische Potential der neuen digitalen Möglichkeiten sozialer Kontrolle ist derzeit in China zu beobachten. Dort erprobt die Regierung derzeit einen „Social Score“, der verschiedene Datenbanken zusammenführt, um das Verhalten von Unternehmen, Personen und Organisation ganzheitlich zu bewerten. Der Score entscheidet letztlich über den Zugang zu Leistungen und Gütern.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nhttps://twitter.com/tweetbaack/status/993556086845247489\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nDie sich aus dieser Bewertungsökonomie ergebenden Ungerechtigkeiten und Formen der Exklusion zu politisieren, ist schwerer als in früheren Zeiten. Personen werden nicht mehr anhand von greif- und erfahrbaren Unterscheidungen – wie beispielsweise klassenspezifischen Statusmerkmalen – erfasst, sondern mittels eines scheinbar unsichtbaren und oft opaken Klassifizierungssystems individuell sortiert. Das Entstehen solidarischer Bande, die durch einen gemeinsamen sozialen Status oder durch geteilte Exklusionserfahrungen geknüpft werden können, wird so deutlich erschwert. Im Gegenteil vermittelt die moralisierende Logik des Ubercapitals dem Individuum ein Gefühl der Eigenverantwortung für die eigene Lage und sich eventuell ergebende Benachteiligungen.\r\n\r\n[photospace ids=\"47298,47296,47294,47292,47284,47286,47288,47290,47282,47280,47278\"]\r\n\r\nHistorisch betrachtet mussten Menschen die Grundlage für kollektives Handeln immer erst aktiv schaffen, wie etwa durch die Erarbeitung eines geteilten Verständnisses über ihre gemeinsame Lage. Erst daraus können sich Narrative speisen, die politische Mobilisierung ermöglichen. Aufgrund dessen ist die derzeitige Debatte über die Digitalisierung und ihre gesellschaftlichen Implikationen so relevant: Sie ist ein erster Schritt für die Lösung neu entstehender Ungerechtigkeiten und Formen der Exklusion in der digitalen Gesellschaft.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nDie Redenreihe Making Sense of the Digital Society wird am 24. September 2018 mit Stephen Graham fortgesetzt. Wenn Sie auf dem Laufenden bleiben möchten, können Sie hier unseren Veranstaltungsnewsletter abonnieren.\r\n\r\n \";s:18:\"responsive_display\";s:0:\"\";s:18:\"visibility_display\";s:0:\"\";s:26:\"visibility_user_capability\";s:0:\"\";s:9:\"animation\";s:0:\"\";s:15:\"animation_delay\";s:3:\"0.0\";s:2:\"id\";s:0:\"\";s:5:\"class\";s:0:\"\";s:10:\"margin_top\";s:0:\"\";s:17:\"margin_top_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:21:\"margin_top_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:12:\"margin_right\";s:0:\"\";s:19:\"margin_right_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:23:\"margin_right_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:13:\"margin_bottom\";s:0:\"\";s:20:\"margin_bottom_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:24:\"margin_bottom_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:11:\"margin_left\";s:0:\"\";s:18:\"margin_left_medium\";s:0:\"\";s:22:\"margin_left_responsive\";s:0:\"\";s:4:\"type\";s:9:\"rich-text\";}}}"],"_oembed_a49968b1519d08100763f578deb318c4":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_a49968b1519d08100763f578deb318c4":["1530775017"],"_oembed_2758a8ef5a3993ca51155d9bb807761a":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_2758a8ef5a3993ca51155d9bb807761a":["1530775017"],"_oembed_5ad9dc2848d89b829c118195a386750c":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_5ad9dc2848d89b829c118195a386750c":["1530775017"],"_oembed_1c3edc78d2f5c939d8e64d330e4ecc8f":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_1c3edc78d2f5c939d8e64d330e4ecc8f":["1530775017"],"_oembed_18d58103e37f91d0e38b3a56add663de":["

Visibility is a trap, but invisibility can be a trap, too. Marion Fourcade #DigitalSociety

— Nelli Piattoeva (@NelliPiattoeva) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_18d58103e37f91d0e38b3a56add663de":["1531389613"],"_oembed_97e593409beaeefed7f45a8e7ecc4958":["

In our data economy, individuals are categorized on the basis of the sum of their digital interactions. This "Ubercapital" transcends a person's ability to shape her classification and is the emerging currency of the digital moral economy. Foucard @ #DigitalSociety @hiig_berlin

— Felix Beer (@felix_beer) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_d294a762f616a1d037dae476bfeca52d":["

"Applying for credit was the original sin of modern consumer surveillance.“ Marion Fourcade w/reference to Josh Lauer’s history of consumer credits (Creditworthy, https://t.co/jqQoLrUydi) #DigitalSociety

— Christian Katzenbach (@ckatzenbach) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_97e593409beaeefed7f45a8e7ecc4958":["1531389613"],"_oembed_time_d294a762f616a1d037dae476bfeca52d":["1531389613"],"_oembed_2763f3275b3d05bad0dead9bef2a217f":["

Social order created by categories and rankings hard to contest bcs there is no natural solidarity among people categorized in a certain way. In the end, 'it is just you': individual behavior determines outcomes, making it appear more legitimate #digitalsociety

— Stefan Baack (@tweetbaack) May 7, 2018
"],"_oembed_time_2763f3275b3d05bad0dead9bef2a217f":["1531389614"]},"image":[{"@type":"ImageObject","@id":"https://www.hiig.de/die-sozialordnung-der-digitalen-gesellschaft/#primaryimage","url":"https://www.hiig.de/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/artur-luczka-626939-unsplash-1200x675.jpg","width":"1200","height":"675"},{"@type":"ImageObject","url":"https://www.hiig.de/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/artur-luczka-626939-unsplash-1200x900.jpg","width":"1200","height":"900"},{"@type":"ImageObject","url":"https://www.hiig.de/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/artur-luczka-626939-unsplash-1200x675.jpg","width":"1200","height":"675"}]}] Zum Inhalt springen
artur-luczka-626939-unsplash

Die Sozialordnung der digitalen Gesellschaft

26 Juni 2018 | doi: 10.5281/zenodo.1303313

Daten sind in der heutigen digitalen Ökonomie so bedeutsam, dass viele BeobachterInnen von ihnen als „Öl des 21. Jahrhunderts“ sprechen. Diejenigen Unternehmen, die am meisten Daten sammeln, haben einen entscheidenden Wettbewerbsvorteil. Die ertragreichen Geschäftsmodelle von Internetriesen wie Google, Amazon oder Facebook basieren darauf, NutzerInnen miteinander in Interaktion zu bringen und dadurch große Mengen von wertvollen Daten zu generieren. Diese Grundstruktur der Datenökonomie beschreibt Marion Fourcade als einen faustischen Pakt – im Tausch für die kostenfreien Dienste im Internet müssen wir unsere Seele in Form unserer Privatsphäre preisgeben.

 

Am 7. Mai 2018 führte Marion Fourcade die Redenreihe Making Sense of the Digital Society fort. Fourcade ist Professorin für Soziologie an der University of California in Berkeley und Direktorin am Max Planck-Science Po Center on Coping with Instability in Market Society in Paris. In ihrem bald erscheinendem Buch „The Ordinal Society“ beschäftigt sie sich mit neuen Formen sozialer Stratifizierung und Moral in der digitalen Ökonomie.

Passenderweise legte Marion Fourcade nur wenige Tage nach Karl Marx 200. Geburtstag den Fokus auf Fragen der sozialen Ungleichheit und Exklusion in der digitalen Gesellschaft. In ihrem Vortrag zur Sozialordnung der digitalen Gesellschaft setzte sie sich mit den sozialen Folgen der heutigen Datensammelpraktiken auseinander.

 

 

Das ökonomische Interesse an persönlichen Daten besteht nicht erst seit der Digitalisierung, hält Fourcade fest. Das Kreditwesen in den USA begann bereits in den 1840er Jahren, Informationen über HändlerInnen zu sammeln, um deren Kreditwürdigkeit zu evaluieren. In den 1870ern wurde damit begonnen, Informationen über KonsumentInnen zu nutzen. In den 1970er und 80er Jahren fand eine Konzentration des Kreditauskunftswesens statt, die mit der zeitgleich stattfindenden Computerisierung dafür sorgte, dass immer präzisere finanzielle Identitäten entstanden. So entstand eine immer differenzierte Klassifizierung von Personen, welche die Bedingungen zur Vergabe eines Kredits festlegte – der sogenannte „Credit Score“ war geboren. Das für die digitale Gesellschaft charakteristische Modell individualisierter Profile hat also seinen Ursprung im Finanzwesen. Die Logik der Quantifizierbarkeit und Effizienzsteigerung breitet sich nun auf weitere Bereiche – wie den Versicherungs-, Gesundheits- oder den Arbeitsmarkt – aus, und beeinflusst unsere Lebenschancen in vielerlei Hinsicht.

 

 

Als gesellschaftliche Implikation dieser Entwicklung diagnostiziert Fourcade das Entstehen eines Regimes der Sichtbarkeit. Im digitalen Zeitalter werden unsere Möglichkeiten der Quantifizierung und Evaluierung unserer Tätigkeiten zu entkommen zunehmend geringer. Eine Gesellschaft von gläsernen Bürgern entsteht. Transparenz entsteht hierbei jedoch nur einseitig. Denn während wir immer transparenter werden, wird der Umgang der Unternehmen mit unseren Daten immer undurchsichtiger. Der Versuch sich diesem Trend durch eine Rückkehr zum Analogen zu entziehen, scheint keine gangbare Lösung darzustellen. Ganz im Gegenteil kann Unsichtbarkeit sogar negative Konsequenzen mit sich bringen: Denn auch dies ist eine Art von evaluierbarem Verhalten und stellt für viele Klassifizierungssysteme eine nicht-vertrauenswürdige Kategorie dar.

 

 

Eine US-Wissenschaftlerin, die im Selbstversuch ihre Schwangerschaft zu verbergen versuchte, indem sie ausschließlich mit Bargeld bezahlte, geriet beispielsweise ins Visier der Polizei, als sie mit einem Amazon-Warengutschein im Wert von 500 Dollar bezahlen wollte. Das Bezahlen mit Bargeld gilt in den USA als Merkmal von Personen mit geringem Einkommen. Deshalb wird es mit Kriminalität – wie zum Beispiel im konkreten Fall mit Geldwäsche – in Verbindung gebracht. Menschen, die in diese Kategorie fallen, leiden daher oft unter struktureller Diskriminierung. Marion Fourcade tauft diese Gruppe in Anlehnung an Karl Marx „Lumpenscoretariat“.

 

 

Vieles von dem, was in früheren Zeiten im privaten Raum verborgen blieb, ist heute sichtbar. Pierre Bourdieu folgend spricht Fourcade dabei von einer neu entstandenen Kapitalform, dem „Überkapital“. Dieses ist zunächst einmal eine ironische Anspielung auf das Online-Dienstleistungsunternehmen Uber. Zugleich verweist es jedoch auf das deutsche Wort über – als Metakategorie und Verweis auf dessen Überlegenheit gegenüber individueller Selbstbestimmung. Als aggregierte Evaluierung unserer digitalen Spuren bestimmt das Überkapital unsere Position im sozialen Raum, entzieht sich jedoch weitestgehend unserer eigenen Einsicht und Kontrolle. Dadurch entscheidet es zunehmend über unseren Zugang zu Gütern, Dienstleistungen und letztlich auch über unsere Lebenschancen.

 

 

Effizienz und Profite entstehen in der digitalen Gesellschaft dadurch, dass Menschen basierend auf algorithmischer Auswertung klassifiziert werden. Individuen geraten so zunehmend unter Druck, sich in ihrem Verhalten anzupassen und zu optimieren. Damit ist die digitale Ordnung der Klassifizierung auch eine moralische.

Zugleich verbergen sich in der Konzeption der Algorithmen oft strukturelle Diskriminierungen, wodurch Überkapital die Tendenz aufweist, bereits bestehende soziale Ungleichheiten weiter zu verstärken. Das orwellianische Potential der neuen digitalen Möglichkeiten sozialer Kontrolle ist derzeit in China zu beobachten. Dort erprobt die Regierung derzeit einen „Social Score“, der verschiedene Datenbanken zusammenführt, um das Verhalten von Unternehmen, Personen und Organisation ganzheitlich zu bewerten. Der Score entscheidet letztlich über den Zugang zu Leistungen und Gütern.

 

 

Die sich aus dieser Bewertungsökonomie ergebenden Ungerechtigkeiten und Formen der Exklusion zu politisieren, ist schwerer als in früheren Zeiten. Personen werden nicht mehr anhand von greif- und erfahrbaren Unterscheidungen – wie beispielsweise klassenspezifischen Statusmerkmalen – erfasst, sondern mittels eines scheinbar unsichtbaren und oft opaken Klassifizierungssystems individuell sortiert. Das Entstehen solidarischer Bande, die durch einen gemeinsamen sozialen Status oder durch geteilte Exklusionserfahrungen geknüpft werden können, wird so deutlich erschwert. Im Gegenteil vermittelt die moralisierende Logik des Überkapitals dem Individuum ein Gefühl der Eigenverantwortung für die eigene Lage und sich eventuell ergebende Benachteiligungen.

Historisch betrachtet mussten Menschen die Grundlage für kollektives Handeln immer erst aktiv schaffen, wie etwa durch die Erarbeitung eines geteilten Verständnisses über ihre gemeinsame Lage. Erst daraus können sich Narrative speisen, die politische Mobilisierung ermöglichen. Aufgrund dessen ist die derzeitige Debatte über die Digitalisierung und ihre gesellschaftlichen Implikationen so relevant: Sie ist ein erster Schritt für die Lösung neu entstehender Ungerechtigkeiten und Formen der Exklusion in der digitalen Gesellschaft.

 

Die Redenreihe Making Sense of the Digital Society wird am 24. September 2018 mit Stephen Graham fortgesetzt. Wenn Sie auf dem Laufenden bleiben möchten, können Sie hier unseren Veranstaltungsnewsletter abonnieren.

 

Dieser Beitrag spiegelt die Meinung der Autorinnen und Autoren und weder notwendigerweise noch ausschließlich die Meinung des Institutes wider. Für mehr Informationen zu den Inhalten dieser Beiträge und den assoziierten Forschungsprojekten kontaktieren Sie bitte info@hiig.de

Marc Pirogan

Ehem. Studentischer Mitarbeiter: Die Entwicklung der digitalen Gesellschaft

Felix Beer

Ehem. Studentischer Mitarbeiter: Die Entwicklung der digitalen Gesellschaft

HIIG Monthly Digest

Jetzt anmelden und  die neuesten Blogartikel gesammelt per Newsletter erhalten.

Man sieht in Leuchtschrift das Wort "Ethical"

Digitale Ethik

Ob Zivilgesellschaft, Politik oder Wissenschaft – alle scheinen sich einig, dass die Neuen Zwanziger im Zeichen der Digitalisierung stehen werden. Doch wo stehen wir aktuell beim Thema digitale Ethik? Wie schaffen wir eine digitale Transformation unter Einbindung der Gesamtgesellschaft, also auch der Menschen, die entweder nicht die finanziellen Mittel oder aber auch das nötige Know-How besitzen, um von der Digitalisierung zu profitieren?  Und was bedeuten diese umfassenden Änderungen unseres Agierens für die Demokratie? In diesem Dossier wollen wir diese Fragen behandeln und Denkanstöße bieten.

Discover all 12 articles

Weitere Artikel

Presseräte

Plattformräte: Können sie digitale Plattformen zur Verantwortung drängen?

Können Handlungen digitaler Plattformen gegenüber ihren Nutzer*innen durch Plattformräte rechenschaftspflichtig gemacht werden?

Accepting cookies

Datenschutz ja, aber mit Cookies? Was steckt hinter dem “Privacy Paradox”?

Warum stimmen wir Datenschutzvereinbarungen wie Cookies auf einer Website viel schneller zu und beachten sie online weniger als offline? Über das Privacy-Paradox-Phänomen

Algorithmische Inhaltemoderation – Was kann bleiben, was muss weg?

Automatisiertes Löschen in den sozialen Netzwerken gefährdet die Meinungsfreiheit. Wie könnten Regeln für die Moderation von Online-Inhalten aussehen? Autorin A. Borchardt beleuchtet einige Vorschläge.